Should we blame technology for increased healthcare spending?

Healthcare economists mistake cause and effect

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Should we blame technology for the growth in healthcare spending?  Austin Frakt, a healthcare economist who writes for the New York Times, thinks so.  Citing several studies conducted over the last several years, he claims that technology could account for up to two-thirds of per capita healthcare spending growth.

In this piece, Frakt contrasts the contribution of technology to that of the ageing of the population.  Frakt notes that age per se is a poor marker of costs associated with healthcare utilization.  What’s important is the amount of money spent near death.  If you’re 80 years old and healthy, your usage of healthcare services won’t be much more than that of a 40-year-old person.

So far, so good.  But should we accept the proposition that technology is the culprit for healthcare spending growth?

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The body language of assisted suicide

What the verbal request fails to reveal

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Laws that allow assisted suicide restrict the provision of “aid-in-dying” drugs to patients whose mental status is not impaired and who are capable of sound judgment.

Medscape recently featured a video interview of Timothy Quill, the palliative care specialist and long-term assisted suicide activist.  He is interviewed by the ethicist Arthur Caplan, and the two discuss the psychological evaluation of terminally ill patients who request physician-assisted suicide (PAS).

Several points made by Quill caught my attention.

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Evidence that women are better cooks than men

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I must admit that my initial reaction to the now famous study by Ashish Jha and colleagues—showing that female internists achieve slightly better 30-day inpatient mortality rates than male internists—was one of annoyance.  “Here we go again,” I thought.  “Data mining at the service of political correctness.”  And I was pleased to read David Shaywitz reply to the study with a piece in Forbes aptly titled “When Science Confirms Your Cherished Beliefs—Worry.”

That said, I must give credit to the study authors for generating a lot of interesting discussion and for stimulating Saurabh Jha to write his magnificent commentary “Homme Fatale.”

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